Category Archives: Resources

Moses bridge in Netherlands

By , | Amazing Places, Resources | 0 Comments

The Moses Bridge, as its name suggests, is pedestrian bridge that creates the illusion of walking through water — in this case, the West-Brabant waterline near Fort de Roovere in the Netherlands.

Designed by RO & AD Architects, the bridge was built using Accoya wood, a type of modified wood that offers the enhanced durability necessary to sustain a sunken bridge.

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A Handy Bookmark

By , | Amazon.com, Resources | 0 Comments

FingerPrint A Handy Bookmark

Are your books all tatty with dog ears? Do you still lose your place when you nod off in the middle of a sentence? Just snap FingerPrint right around your book and point it to the last word you read. It stretches to fit any size book from “Dick and Jane” to “War and Peace”. Use it as a handy book strap too. In Green, Blue-Gray, and Orange assorted, FingerPrint is molded from durable silicone rubber, and packed on a billboard card inside a peggable clear headerbag.

More Information >>>> http://amzn.to/1dY3rKH

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A Quick Treat

By , | Chocolate, Resources | 0 Comments

Any nut butter will do the trick 😉

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Sugar Addiction

By , | Informational, Resources | 0 Comments

Sugar Addiction: The perpetual cycle

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Agave

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Many people interested in staying healthy have switched to agave as a safer “natural” sweetener. They want to avoid well documented dangerous sweeteners like HFCS (high fructose corn syrup) but are unaware that most agave is actually WORSE than HFCS.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/03/30/beware-of-the-agave-nectar-health-food.aspx

 

The conclusion is clear. Agave nectar is bad for you. It’s not traditional, not natural, highly refined, and contains more concentrated fructose than high fructose corn syrup.

from: http://www.foodrenegade.com/agave-nectar-good-or-bad/

“The process by which agave glucose and inulin are converted into “nectar” is similar to the process by which corn starch is converted into HFCS. The agave starch is subject to an enzymatic and chemical process that converts the starch into a fructose-rich syrup—anywhere from 70 percent fructose and higher according …

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